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New ACTTAB HQ – A fair bet for Gungahlin

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ACTTAB CEO Tony Curtis, Lorna Howell (longserving ACTTAB employee whom the centre was named after) and the Chief Minister
Chief Minister Jon Stanhope today officially opened ACTTAB Limited’s new hi-tech Head Office in Gungahlin.

Mr Stanhope said the new centre embodies the ACT Government’s intention to see more commercial development and activity in Gungahlin.

“ACTTAB Ltd has always been an important contributor to the ACT economy,” he said. “By placing this centre and its 35 staff in Gungahlin, it will now become an even more important contributor to the economy and community of Canberra’s north.

“ACTTAB’s new Head Office covers an area of 1500 square metres providing space for all administrative, data and call centre staff and associated technical facilities. It is a great example of the type of modern, hi-tech workplace the ACT Government has and continues to work to attract to the Territory.

“The $4.6 million fit-out provides a bright modern working environment for ACTTAB’s staff and places the latest technology at their disposal.

“The new data centre is one of the most advanced in the ACT region and one of the first to be designed and built in accordance with the latest international data centre design standards.

The data centre will provide support for ACTTAB’s 16 retail stores and 37 sub-agencies throughout the Territory, and will also provide data links with interstate partners such as Tabcorp.

Mr Stanhope said the centre is a great example of the success of the ACT racing industry and a great investment in the future of Canberra’s north,” he said.

Statement Ends
Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Chief Minister releases health and environmental reports on Water2WATER proposal

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CHIEF MINISTER RELEASES HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTS ON Water2WATER PROPOSAL

Chief Minister and Minister for Water and Climate Change Jon Stanhope today released the Expert Panel on Health’s final report, Public Health and Safety in relation to Water Purification for Drinking Water Supplies, and eWater CRC’s Interim Environmental Opinion on ACTEW’s Water2WATER proposal to recycle water.

The Chief Minister said recycling was one of a suite of options the ACT Government and ACTEW were considering to secure Canberra’s water supply.

“Both reports were commissioned to provide the Government with independent advice on the health and safety and environmental issues arising from ACTEW’s Water2WATER proposal,” Mr Stanhope said.

“The Expert Panel on Health’s final report addresses areas of concern raised by the community throughout the consultation period, as well as the technical aspects of the proposal with respect to health and safety.

“Both the Expert Panel’s report and CRC’s Interim Environmental Opinion conclude that a reverse osmosis-based water purification plant is feasible as a method of increasing the water supply for Canberra.”

“This of course is subject to stringent environmental issues being addressed, health and safety requirements being met, and the approval of ACT Health as the regulatory body.

“I look forward to receiving eWater CRC’s final report and meeting with the Expert Panel on Health next week to discuss their findings.”

The Expert Panel on Health’s final report, and eWater CRC’s Interim Environmental Opinion on ACTEW’s Water2WATER proposal can be viewed online at www.expertpanelonhealth.canberra.net.au and www.actew.com.au/water2water

Statement Ends

Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 51690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Student accommodation to increase rental supply

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Chief Minister Jon Stanhope today announced that the Australian National University (ANU) Exchange had finalised plans for new student accommodation to cater for more than 500 people in the ACT Government’s City West Planning area.

The six-storey building on Kingsley, Childers and Hutton Streets will accommodate 514 students, include parking and have an active street frontage, to add to the growing vibrancy of Childers Street. The building is scheduled to be completed in late 2008.

“In line with the Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan, this development will help increase the supply and range of rental properties, freeing up rental properties now occupied by students and making them available to the general market,” Mr Stanhope said.

This is the second student accommodation development in the ANU Exchange. More than 500 students moved in to the ANU Uni Lodge on Childers Street earlier this year.

The ANU Exchange precinct is expected to create up to 2000 new residential places and more than 7,000 jobs once fully developed. A high-tech research/commercial facility is currently in the final stages before land sale and is expected to commence in the next few months.

“Following the Territory’s endorsement of the ANU Exchange Master Plan and Implementation Plan last year, we now have a blueprint for the flexible use of land within and adjacent to the ANU precinct, spanning Barry Drive in the north to Gordon Street in the south,” Mr Stanhope said.

“The ANU Exchange is a partnership between the ACT Government and ANU which allows for a dynamic mix of land uses and activities – essential for the vitalisation of City West.

“By encouraging institutional investors such as the ANU, the Government is helping ensure that the university can increase its activities, improve its integration with the city and make an even greater contribution to the Territory’s economy.

An interim car park for more than 100 cars will be constructed as part of the student accommodation development. In addition, remaining car parks will be restructured to increase accessibility and numbers, with the ANU Exchange funding these activities as well as the relocation and temporary accommodation of the community groups currently located on the site.

Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 51690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Rainwater tanks for Gorman House historic gardens

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Five rainwater tanks will be installed at the Gorman House Arts Centre today, enabling the heritage-listed facility to better maintain its historic gardens through periods of uncertain rainfall, Chief Minister Jon Stanhope said today.

The five 5000-litre tanks, installed with $10,000 of funding through artsACT, are an example of the measures the Government is taking across its agencies to reduce potable water use by ACT Government facilities.

“Gorman House, one of Canberra’s oldest community arts centres, was granted an exemption under Stage 3 water restrictions due to its heritage listing,” Mr Stanhope said today. “However, it would be unlikely to be granted an exemption if Stage 4 restrictions come into effect later this year. It was therefore necessary to take steps to ensure that the centre’s gardens could be maintained through other means.”

Gorman House dates from 1925 and the gardens include many original feature plants and others grown from heritage cuttings.

Heritage approval has been granted for the installation of the tanks, with the size, colour and placement designed to minimise visual impact.

Mr Stanhope said the ACT’s newest arts facility, the Canberra Glassworks also incorporated a range of water-saving measures. Rainwater collected from the large roof area was stored in the original Powerhouse condenser-tanks and used in the centre’s toilets, hand-basins and continually recycled for use in glass-working processes.

For information about rainwater tanks, ACT Government rebate programs and services, and advice to help make your home, garden, school or business more water efficient, visit www.thinkwater.act.gov.au or phone 13 22 81.

Statement Ends

Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 51690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Angle Crossing, Tantangara could meet 1/3 of needs

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Pumping water from Angle Crossing and obtaining water from Tantangara Dam were two cross-border water security options that could provide up to 20 gigalitres of water a year – almost a third of the total water demand in the ACT region, Chief Minister Jon Stanhope said today.
Mr Stanhope said the ACT Government and ACTEW were re-examining all previous water security options, along with emerging possibilities, in response to historic low inflows and a growing uncertainty about future rainfall patterns in the region.
“With record low inflows in 2006 and poor inflows again in 2007 we are looking at all potential sources and options,” Mr Stanhope said. “Most Canberrans would be well aware of the extensive consultation that has just concluded in relation to ACTEW’s proposal to recycle water and to enlarge the Cotter Dam. These are among a range of options the Government may ultimately pursue, in combination, to secure Canberra’s water supply and reduce our dependence on uncertain rainfall.”
Mr Stanhope said he was writing to neighbouring parties including the Federal Member for Eden-Monaro, Gary Nairn, the State Member for Monaro, Steve Whan, and the Mayor of Queanbeyan, Frank Pangallo, to seek their views and cooperation on possible cross-border options that could help secure the water supply of Canberra and the areas in NSW that were currently supplied by the ACT.
NSW planning approvals would be needed for the Angle Crossing option, and support from NSW would also be required for the Tantangara option.
The Angle Crossing option has already been well-developed by ACTEW as part of its Future Water Options work. Other elements of that work, such as the Cotter-to-Googong Bulk Transfer scheme have already been implemented.
The Angle Crossing option involves extracting water from the Murrumbidgee River at Angle Crossing and piping it to the Googong reservoir. This would supplement ACTEW’s capacity to capture water from the Cotter catchment and store it in the Googong catchment.
The Tantangara option would involve the release of water from the Tantangara reservoir, which would flow into the ACT and be captured at Angle Crossing or Cotter.
The cross-border options are part of a suite of options the ACT Government and ACTEW are considering or have already implemented. Those underway include:

. major enhancements to the Stromlo and Googong Water Treatment Plants;
. the extraction of water from the Cotter Dam;
. the installation of submersible pumps in the Murrumbidgee River; and
. a $17 million stormwater harvesting project in partnership with the Australian Water Fund.

Strategies to encourage wise and efficient use of water are part and parcel of the Government’s approach. Initiatives introduced since the publication of the Think water, Act water strategy in 2004 include:
. the introduction of Permanent Water Conservation Measures;
. the introduction of residential water efficiency programs providing rebates, water-efficient products and expert advice for saving water in the home and garden;
. rebates for rainwater tanks with internal plumbing connections;
. publication of guidelines for greywater use;
. commercial water audit programs to help businesses identify water wastage;
. water audits for schools participating in the Sustainable Schools pilot program;
. extension of the successful COMTROL irrigation system to schools, sportsgrounds and urban parkland;
. plumbing regulations requiring the separation of plumbing in new homes to enable greater use of greywater and rainwater; and
. the implementation of water-sensitive urban design guidelines.

Statement Ends

Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@a

"India in Focus" to strengthen new business opportunities

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Chief Minister and Minister for Business and Economic Development, Jon Stanhope today announced the ACT Government would host India in Focus, a special two-day event aimed at building and strengthening new business opportunities between Canberra and India.

“India in Focus will take place on 22 and 23 October and is an important follow-up to the successful ACT-India Trade Mission I led earlier this year,” Mr Stanhope said.

“India in Focus will provide a vehicle for businesses and organisations to explore first-hand the opportunities that exist between our two strong and growing economies.

“During the ACT-India Trade Mission many organisations and businesses we met with expressed a strong interest in coming to Canberra this year to explore opportunities directly.

“India in Focus will comprise a comprehensive schedule of activities to help organisations from India and Canberra explore new opportunities to do business together.”

India in Focus will provide an informative and packed program including:
. a business-to-business contact program, organised by Austrade;
. a number of business building events, such as an innovation showcase;
. a panel session on business opportunities in the ICT and education services sectors;
. a major projects symposium highlighting the current and future business opportunities in the ACT; and
. a range of networking opportunities, including an India-themed gala dinner at the National Convention Centre, which will be newly re-opened at that time.

“The event is timed to be part of the Indian Diwali celebrations, the Indian Festival of Lights. During this period many Indians travel for business and explore new opportunities, returning home in time to celebrate the Diwali in early November,” Mr Stanhope said.

“India in Focus will provide an excellent opportunity to build partnerships and encourage future trade between businesses in India and the ACT.”

For further information on India in Focus, please contact Leah Busacker on 6205 4624.

Statement Ends
Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Nominations open for ACT 2008 Australian of the Year Awards

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Chief Minister Jon Stanhope today encouraged all Canberrans to nominate outstanding locals for the 2008 Australian of the Year Awards.

“The Australian of the Year Awards are about celebrating people in our society who are making extraordinary contributions. From great national achievers to those quiet acheivers whose selfless contributions make a real difference in our local communities,” Mr Stanhope said.

“The Canberra community is rich with people who achieve great things and make significant contributions to the life of this city.

“Nominees may have achieved excellence in their chosen field, made a significant contribution to the local or Australian community or be an inspirational role model to others.”

The nomination period for the 2008 Australian of the Year Awards was launched earlier this week in Sydney by Prime Minister John Howard.

There are four categories in the Australian of the Year Awards:
. Australian of the Year – open to all Australians who deserve recognition for their extraordinary achievements, contributions to the community and nation, and who are inspirational role models for all Australians;
. Senior Australian of the Year – recognises those Australians aged 60 years and over who continue to achieve and contribute to the community;
. Young Australian of the Year – recognises those extraordinary young Australians aged 16-25 years who are contributing to our community; and
. Australia’s Local Hero – recognises Australians who make a real difference in their local communities and whose outstanding contributions enrich the lives of those around them.

“I encourage everyone to nominate a great Canberran to ensure that the ACT is well represented in the national awards,” Mr Stanhope said. “The winners of the ACT Awards go on to represent the Territory at a national level and will be announced as part of our Australia Day celebrations.”

Winners of the 2007 awards were Mr Michael Milton as ACT Australian of the Year, Dr Kaye Price as ACT Senior Australian of the Year, Mr John Van den Dungen as ACT Young Australian of the Year and Ms Beverly Orr as ACT Local Hero.

Nominations can be made online at www.australianoftheyear.gov.au, by picking up a nomination form at any Commonwealth Bank branch or by phoning 1300 655 193. Nominations close on 31 August 2007.

Statement Ends
Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

Exploring regional water security options

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Chief Minister Jon Stanhope has written to the Federal Member for Eden-Monaro, Gary Nairn, State Member for Monaro, Steve Whan, and the Mayor of Queanbeyan, Frank Pangallo, to seek their ideas and cooperation on cross-border options to secure the water supply of the ACT and those areas of NSW which rely on the ACT for their water.

Mr Stanhope said the ACT Government and ACTEW are examining a range of water security options, including pumping from the Murrumbidgee River at Angle Crossing and obtaining water from Tantangara Dam in addition to ACTEW’s proposal to purify water and enlarge the Cotter Dam.

“These options will require NSW planning approvals and the cooperation of community leaders in the ACT region if they are to be implemented,” Mr Stanhope said.

“The ACT Government is further exploring the extraction of water from the Murrumbidgee River at Angle Crossing and piping it to the Googong reservoir. Another option involves releasing water from Tantangara reservoir, which would flow into the ACT and be captured at Angle Crossing or at the Cotter.

“Although these options rely on rainfall, combined they could provide up to 20 gigalitres a year, or almost a third of the total annual water use in the ACT region.

“The Angle Crossing option has already been well-developed by ACTEW as part of the Future Water Options project with other elements of Future Water Options, such as the Cotter-to-Googong Bulk Transfer project having already been implemented.

“These options could help secure not only Canberra’s water supply, but also the water supplies of those areas in NSW provided by the ACT.

“As this is a regional problem, it requires a regional, cooperative and cross-border response. I look forward to working with Mr Whan, Mr Pangallo, Mr Nairn and others to secure our regional water future,” Mr Stanhope said

Mr Stanhope said the ACT Labor Government and ACTEW continue to deliver projects to secure the ACT and region’s water supply including major enhancements to the Stromlo and Googong Water Treatment Plants, the extraction of water from the Cotter Dam, the installation of submersible pumps in the Murrumbidgee River and investing in a $17 million stormwater harvesting project.

“Additionally, ACTEW has just completed a 3 month community consultation on their Water2WATER purification proposal which could provide Canberra with a water source which is not reliant on uncertain future rainfall patterns,” he said.

“ACTEW’s consultation drew a strong response from the Canberra community. The ACT Government is keen to see the results of that process and hear ACTEW’s advice in relation to the proposal and a number of other options for improving our water security.

“The Government will consider ACTEW’s advice, along with the advice of the Government-appointed Expert Panel on Health and the Water Security Taskforce. Along with the health implications the ACT Government will also consider the environmental impacts, the financial implications and the greenhouse impact.

“Our continued exploration of water security options on top of those measures already delivered demonstrates the ACT Labor Government’s determination to ensure we have the water required to continue to grow our regional economy and maintain Canberra as a sustainable and beautiful city in which to live,” Mr Stanhope said.

Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690

Ethos sculptor visits his 'spirit' of Canberra

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Chief Minister and sculptor Tom Bass with Ethos
One of Australia’s most renowned sculptors, Tom Bass, was in Canberra today, visiting one of his best-loved works – the Ethos statue in Civic Square.

Bass, whose other works in this region include the vast bronze lintel at the front of the National Library of Australia and the Coat of Arms on the front of the Legislative Assembly building, met with Chief Minister and Minister for the Arts Jon Stanhope this morning.

He brought with him a plaster carving he has made of a poem about Ethos he wrote in 2005. Mr Stanhope said the Government would honour Tom Bass’s desire to have the poem cast in bronze and put on permanent display.

Ethos, which was created between 1959 and 1961, was sponsored by the NCDC and the Canberra Chamber of Commerce. In its brief to the artist, the NCDC urged Bass to reflect what it called ‘the restless, virile energetic movement of free enterprise’ of the new capital, and wanted the work to ’emphasise Civic as the non-political centre of the city’.

Bass, with his conviction about the powerful totemic role that could be played by public art, wanted instead to reflect the spirit of a city that was not yet a city, and that would arise from a plan, instead of from the normal city-building impulses.

After a year of false starts, Bass asked a group of Franciscan monks in Campbelltown – near his Minto studio – to pray for inspiration to visit him. The next morning he started work on sketches of a female form. In the final design, the figure of Ethos stands on Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahoney’s famous and recognisable design for the national capital.

Bass believed that the originally proposed name for the work – Spirit of Canberra – sounded too much like a train, and came up with Ethos – Greek for the fundamental spiritual characteristics of a culture.

Ethos is listed on the ACT Heritage Objects register.

Tom Bass’s poem, Ethos Speaks, is attached.

Photographs of today’s visit are available on request.

Statement Ends
Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

ETHOS SPEAKS

I AM ETHOS

THOUGH I DO NOT
SPEAK WITH WORDS
I SPEAK TO YOU
IN OTHER WAYS

I SAY TO YOU THAT
I AM THE SPIRIT
OF THIS PLACE
AND ITS PEOPLE

I AM
THE ORIGINAL SPIRIT
AND THE SPIRIT OF NOW

I RISE FROM THE EARTH
AND REACH FOR THE SUN

I BRING TOGETHER
THE OLD AND NEW

IN ME THERE IS
NO VIOLENCE OR WAR
ONLY PEACE
AND RECONCILIATION

I AM THE LOVE
PEACE AND BEAUTY
OF THIS PLACE

I GIVE YOU
THESE THINGS
EVERY DAY
AND ALWAYS

Invest for Quality, not past performance

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Investor warning: “Invest for quality, not past performance”
Investors are still focusing too heavily on short-term market performance and failing to consider whether they are investing in quality assets at a good price, according to local financial adviser Wayne Byrne.
Wayne, from financial planning firm, Vanzwan Accounting Plus says markets move in cycles, with growth oriented assets (such as shares) tending to perform better when economies are growing, whereas the more defensive assets (such as fixed interest) perform relatively better when the economy is not doing so well.
“Sometimes an investment is like an empty restaurant – everyone wants to go into the full restaurant instead, but with shares, it doesn’t mean it’s better because it’s more popular,” Wayne said.
“It’s just not possible to know from one year to the next what the top performing asset class will be. In fact, chasing past performance is often a recipe for future under-performance.”
However whilst we do know that negative returns are not unusual, we can minimise the likelihood of a negative return by holding assets for a suitable period.
“Analysis conducted by Count shows that on an annual basis, Australian equities have a 21.2% chance of a negative return, but if you hold the same investment for 5 years the chance of a negative return falls to just over 1%. Fixed interest, an asset class that investors do not normally associate with negative returns, has also experienced periods of underperformance – on an annual basis the probability of a negative return is 7.8%, but on a three-year basis this falls to 0%.”
“We also know that there will be times when assets underperform and when they outperform, but fortunately not all asset classes move in the same cycle, so it makes sense to have a well diversified portfolio. It also makes sense not to focus on past performance.”
Wayne comments, “Past performance should not be used as an indication of future returns unless you also consider how that past performance was achieved – what the fund manager did, how they did it, what the market was doing and whether it can be repeated”.
“Rather than focusing on short-term past performance in managed funds, investors should consider how the fund manager runs their business, how they select the underlying investments in the fund, and whether the long-term returns (5-7 years) generated are appropriate relative to the cost.”
This helps to establish whether the fund manager can consistently deliver above-average returns over the long-term.
To help investors avoid the trap of chasing past performance, Wayne provides the following tips:
1. Select good quality fund managers that have been analysed and rated by an independent research house;
2. Use diversified funds that are invested across a number of different sectors. This way, better performing assets can offset poorer performing assets. This provides a less volatile overall return profile;
3. Select a number of different managers that adopt different approaches to investing. Investigate the investment style of different fund managers – some fund managers perform better in times of strong economic growth, whilst others perform better when economic conditions are more uncertain;
4. Remember the time frame that you are investing for. If you are investing in Australian equity, International equity or diversified funds, you need to have an investment profile of at least 3-5 years in order to limit the effect of short-term market volatility. Select quality assets at a reasonable price and hold them for the long-term – don’t chop and change with the market or you will inevitably buy when prices are high and sell when they’re low; and
5. Seek professional advice if you do not have the resources to thoroughly investigate your prospective investments.

Wayne Byrne is an Authorised Representative of Count Wealth Accountants® , an Australian Financial Services Licensee (No. 227232) and Australia’s largest independently owned network of financial planning accountants and advisers.
The advice provided is general advice only as, in preparing it, we did not take into account your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. Before making an investment decision on the basis of this advice, you should consider how appropriate the advice is to your particular investment needs, objectives and financial circumstances.
For more information:

Wayne Byrne
Vanzwan Accounting Plus Pty Ltd
02 6251 4888

Read while you ride, with "Poetry in ACTION"

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Poems from six of the ACT’s most talented poets will appear in ACTION buses across Canberra from today, as Poetry in ACTION again hits the fleet, Chief Minister and Minister for the Arts Jon Stanhope announced today.

Now in its second year, Poetry in ACTION is one of the most broad-reaching poetry initiatives in Canberra, taking poetry to about 10,000 bus commuters a day over the coming months.

The winner and long-listed poets from the ACT Poetry Prize’s David Campbell Award were commissioned to write short poems for Poetry in ACTION 2007: Adrian Caesar, Melinda Smith, Susan Hampton, Lesley Lebkowicz, Maggie Shapley and Ken Gardiner.

“Poetry in ACTION celebrates the work of local poets, promotes the ACT Poetry Prize and makes riding public transport a more enriching and pleasurable experience,” Mr Stanhope said.

“The initiative is consistent with the Government’s commitment to give all Canberrans opportunities to engage with the arts, and to take the arts to people where they work, live and play.”

Mr Stanhope also announced that this year the poems will also be displayed on the back of six ACTION buses.

Information on Poetry in ACTION and the ACT Poetry Prize is available on the artsACT website at www.arts.act.gov.au . Poetry in ACTION poems and prize-winning poems from the 2006 ACT Poetry Prize can also be read on the website.

Statement Ends
Media Contact: Penelope Layland 6205 9777 0438 289 714 penelope.layland@act.gov.au
Paul Kindermann 6205 1690 0403 600 955 paul.kindermann@act.gov.au

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Arts & Craft Show a success

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Yarralumla Uniting Arts & Crafts Show
A well-known feature of the Canberra calendar, the annual Midwinter Arts and Crafts Show, took place at the Yarralumla Uniting Church Centre in Denman Street from 29 June to 1 July.

Attended by a large number of Canberrans the show was once again a success. In addition to the wide range of arts and crafts on display there was a fashion parade of wearable art by FlairWear and lace making demonstrations. On both Saturday and Sunday afternoon concerts were held featuring local musicians, choirs and school groups.

This years show raised over $6000 which will go towards a range of local, national and international community programmes.

World Jamboree beckons

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Liz and Jess at the Airport
Jessica McConnell, 14 of Macarthur and Liz Dyer, 15 of Watson left last weekend for the trip of a lifetime to celebrate the centenary of Scouting with 50,000 other Scouts at the World Jamboree in Chelmsford, England.
Scouting started when Baden Powell invited 24 young boys to a Camp on Brownsea Island on the 1st August 1907. Since then over half a billion Scouts worldwide, both boys and girls have experienced the Scouting development program including camps, Gang Shows, outdoor adventure, leadership programs and international events; and taken those skills with them into the community and workforce.
As Scouting enters its second century as the largest youth movement in the world, Jessica and Liz represent the ACT saying “We attended the Australian Jamboree at Elmore, last January with 10,000 Scouts, mud pits, flying and driving lessons, visits to Bendigo and the Murray River, and that was amazing. Now, we have a month away from home (and school), touring London, being part of the Scouting Sunrise at the Jamboree and then a week’s recovery in Dublin with 200 other Australian Scouts. It should be a great experience, meeting Scouts from 214 other countries, experiencing their cultures, food and games, and no parents within cooee.”
Jessica thanks the ACT Scouts for the Jack Deeble Scholarship she received to assist with her trip. Jack was a lifelong Scout who encouraged others to take on new challenges in Australia and abroad.
They will have a fantastic story to tell on their return.